May17 , 2022

    Are Clogs a Foot-Healthy Choice?

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    From restaurants to offices to hospitals to healthcare clinics, clogs are ubiquitous footwear in work and casual environments alike. A traditional clog is made solely from wood, while contemporary clogs incorporate wood soles (or no wood at all) with upper materials such as leather, which allows for more versatility and greater comfort. Today’s clogs (such as Danskos) are inspired by that original wood-style design, and they are sometimes backless, almost always have a heel and pitched toe box, and are usually stiff-soled.

    Clogs are a traditional part of many cultures throughout the world, including Dutch, Swedish, and Japanese cultures, and are worn for several key reasons, including protection, fashion, and for certain types of dance. The popularity of clogs has increased in recent years, as many consumers have been persuaded that clogs are a practical and foot-healthy option.

    But is this belief fact or fiction? And are clogs really any different from “conventional” footwear? Let’s find out.

    Many doctors (including podiatrists) recommend clogs to patients who have foot ailments. Some of the design characteristics that have earned various types of clogs this high praise include anatomically contoured arch support, rocker-bottom soles, and heel elevation — an attribute that some doctors believe eases the strain on leg and back muscles.

    It’s no wonder, then, that clogs have gained an almost mythic reputation for being foot-healthy footwear. Sadly, this reputation is built on an incredible amount of misinformation that touts arch support, bizarre sole construction, and heel elevation as beneficial shoe design features. The idea of clogs as beneficial footwear has gone mainstream, but the underpinnings of this belief are nothing more than regurgitated shoe industry myths about what constitutes a healthy and stable home for your feet.

    The Truth About Clogs

    The truth is, clogs are among the most harmful or injurious shoe types available to consumers. And most clogs share many of the same unfavorable and damaging design elements that other conventional shoes possess (please see the section immediately below for more detailed info about these elements). Clogs, like other conventional shoes, strip your foot of its inherent power, destabilize your main foot arch, and contribute to common toe deformities and problems, such as hallux valgus, bunions, tailor’s bunions, hammertoes, and clawtoes, among others. Clogs also make it difficult for you to experience much (if any) tactile feedback from the ground you walk on, due to their extraordinary thick and rigid soles.

    You won’t hear this truth about clogs from many other sources, which is why it’s so important to heed this warning: Clogs, like other types of conventional footwear, cause or contribute to many foot and toe problems, including neuromas, plantar fasciosis, and ingrown toenails. And they do this because they hold your feet and toes in an unnatural, compromised position for many hours at a time. It’s only by examining the harmful design elements included in most clogs, though, that you’ll get a better sense of how clogs actually impair foot health and cause problems. Also look at the best gardening clogs.

    Harmful Shoe Design Elements

    The truth is, clogs are among the most harmful or injurious shoe types available to consumers. And most clogs share many of the same unfavorable and damaging design elements that other conventional shoes possess (please see the section immediately below for more detailed info about these elements). Clogs, like other conventional shoes, strip your foot of its inherent power, destabilize your main foot arch, and contribute to common toe deformities and problems, such as hallux valgus, bunions, tailor’s bunions, hammertoes, and clawtoes, among others. Clogs also make it difficult for you to experience much (if any) tactile feedback from the ground you walk on, due to their extraordinary thick and rigid soles.

    You won’t hear this truth about clogs from many other sources, which is why it’s so important to heed this warning: Clogs, like other types of conventional footwear, cause or contribute to many foot and toe problems, including neuromas, plantar fasciosis, and ingrown toenails. And they do this because they hold your feet and toes in an unnatural, compromised position for many hours at a time. It’s only by examining the harmful design elements included in most clogs, though, that you’ll get a better sense of how clogs actually impair foot health and cause problems. Article via. Pick Your Sandals

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